Nature on Goldfish Pond

Canada Goose and Nesting Issue

The GPA has taken steps to prevent the Canada Geese from forming nests on the island. This year after planting day, the beds were enclosed with fencing in order to keep birds from entering the area. We hope this will alleviate many of our concerns about nesting and city wide population control.

Why does the water look so bad?

That's because it is bad.

The city of Lynn has been taking several steps to address the polluted water at Goldfish Pond.

History

The Goldfish Pond Assoc was formed in 1980 by neighbors concerned about the overall appearance of the neighborhood. At this time, the city of Lynn allowed the GPA members liberal access to address the problems of trash in the pond. With this came a yearly "cleaning" of the pond, which entailed draining the pond to clean out debris i.e., barrels, bikes, shopping carts, branches etc. You get the picture, pond is drained...trash is removed and fresh new water was added. This was a yearly event  usually occurring in the Spring. Since 2013, this yearly process has stopped.

Last time pond was drained 2013

The last time the pond was drained was in 2013, with the repair of the masonry on the center island. At this time, access to draining and refilling of the pond was taken away from the GPA members. At this time, the city of Lynn and Water and Sewer Commission, will not allow the pond to be drained for two reasons. Reason 1: the pond is polluted. Yes that is correct, they will not drain polluted water into their "system". Reason 2: the price to refill the pond costs too much. 

Solitude Lake Management

Solitude Lake Management has a contract with the city of Lynn to treat the water in the ponds in Lynn including Goldfish Pond. Also, in May 2019 aeration equipment was placed in the pond to add oxygen to the water.

Wild Life on Goldfish Pond

image4

In the water: Fish and Turtles

Goldfish, crayfish, catfish, and many other species of fish have been observed in the pond. Paul Coombs wrote a paper on the various turtles in the pond. He noted Eastern Painted, Red Eared Sliders, and the Common Musk turtle.  

image5

Rare and Exotic Birds

Black-crowned Night Heron is a frequent visitor.

 This bird dives for crayfish and other smaller fish.

image6

Ducks: Canada Goose, Mallards and others

They are a nice sight to see. However, do not feed the birds. Keep the wildlife free of human intervention as much as possible.







Check out more Photos on our Facebook Page, link below